There is a real need for the explanation of how to use Triggers and Post-hypnotic suggestions responsibly with your subjects. Generally speaking as a hypnotist you should prefer Closed Triggers to Open Triggers – the outcomes of a Closed Trigger are more predictable, and the more controlled circumstances will build trust in your subject. There is almost no reason to use an Open Trigger unless your subject specifically requests it. Even then, check that they understand that it could be fired off accidentally, and try to guide them towards a Closed Trigger instead.

Let’s begin with some simple definitions to clarify things:

Trigger – Using trance, the hypnotist can create an association between any action or event, and any other action or event, so that when the first event (called the Triggering Action) occurs, the second action (the Response) will occur.

Response – Whatever the Trigger causes to happen when it fires off is called the Response.

Open Trigger – When a single triggering action causes the firing of a Response.

Closed Trigger – When multiple triggering actions are required to occur in order to cause a Response.

The main downside of Open Triggers is that they can sometimes trigger accidentally, so skilled hypnotists will always use Closed Triggers. They are only slightly more complex to implant, so let’s learn how to use them.

Implanting a Closed Trigger

A Closed Trigger is essentially the same as an Open Trigger, you just use multiple actions required in order to fire it off, rather than a single action. Think about your Online Banking, most banks these days will let you log in with a username and password, but also give you the option of sending a code to your phone. Using multiple factors makes it more secure. Same thing for Closed Triggers. In the case of hypnosis, you might tie a trigger to BOTH a person’s specific voice AND eye contact, so that the effect will only occur when both of those conditions are met.

Step 1 – When do you want it to work?

In designing a Closed Trigger for your subject, first, think about what specific circumstances under which you want it to fire off. What needs to happen? Does it need to happen all at once? Here’s some ideas:

As you can see above, trigger conditions are limited only by your imagination. The best policy is to pick 2 (or no more than 3) and to make one of them “only when it is safe and appropriate” or “only when you’re with me” as a safety mechanism.

Step 2 – Create the Trigger.

Lets see what Closed Triggers look like in practice, by using an example. Lucy asks for a trigger that makes her laugh whenever someone says the word “Bacon”. You discuss with her the desired outcome and decide that a Closed Trigger is more appropriate. When creating the trigger, you set it specifically so that it will ONLY when: someone says the word “Bacon” AND she is looking directly into the eyes of the person saying the word AND it is safe and appropriate. Only then will the trigger engage. You can easily see how this reduces the likelihood of an accidental firing and any potential negative fallout (social embarrassment, loss of trust, etc) from an accidental firing.

Now lets see what they look like with some real-world examples. First, an Open Trigger for having a subject feel Pleasure on command. Trance and the ability of the subject to elicit strong pleasure states on command is assumed.

THIS IS HOW YOU DO IT WRONG. DO NOT DO IT THIS WAY.

“Each and every time that you hear the word “Pleasure” you will instantly feel a deep rush of warm, arousing erotic pleasure, easily as strong as anything you’ve ever felt before. You will find each time that you hear anyone say the word “Pleasure”, that its easy to feel this good, or even better. And if you’re already feeling pleasure, then hearing that word will make you feel it stronger, and stronger. And this will be true for you now, from this point onward all throughout your future.”

THIS IS HOW YOU DO IT WRONG. DO NOT DO IT THIS WAY.

Notice the use of the word “anyone” above, do you think that’s very precise? This trigger could be fired by anyone, which may not be what your subject actually wants. Now notice the language of a Closed Trigger, functionally the same but different in a few areas.

THIS IS HOW YOU DO IT RIGHT.

“Each and every time that you hear me and only me say the word “Pleasure” and you and I are alone together and its safe and appropriate, you will instantly feel a deep rush of warm, arousing erotic pleasure as strong as anything you’ve ever felt before. You will find each time that you hear me and only me say the word “Pleasure”, and you and I are alone together and its safe and appropriate that its easy to feel this good, or even better. And if you’re already feeling pleasure, then hearing that word will make you feel it stronger, and stronger. And this will be true for you now, from this point onward.”

THIS IS HOW YOU DO IT RIGHT.

In the case above, I had negotiated in advance with our subject (a casual lover) that she wished for the trigger to be tied only to my voice, and I then added the additional factors of “and you and I are alone together” and “its safe and appropriate” to create a very specific Closed Trigger. The chances of this Closed Trigger being fired accidentally are much, much reduced over the Open Trigger you saw examined previously. A few simple word additions and our subjects safety and confidence in our skill as a hypnotist are massively improved.

Step 3 – Test and Verify.

As with all of your play, test that your trigger only activates when ALL of the conditions are met, by deliberately giving your subject only a portion of the required conditions, and training her only to respond when ALL of the trigger conditions are met. Praise and reward fro the correct behaviour. If you care about your subjects safety and welfare, and if you want to become a better hypnotist, learn to use Closed Triggers with ALL of your subjects, unless they specifically ask for an Open Trigger (and even then, you always have the right to say no). The real benefit is your subjects increased trust in your concern for their well-being.

Further Discussion Points